Archive for August, 2007

Auto Patcher – no more…..

Posted: August 31, 2007 in Softwares

I am very sad to hear this from Auto Patcher which is no more…………….. 😥

news from Auto Patcher……….

Today we received an e-mail from Microsoft, requesting the immediate take-down of the download page, which of course means that AutoPatcher is probably history. As much as we disagree, we can do very little, and although the download page is merely a collection of mirrors, we took the download page down.

We would like to thank you for your support. For the past 4 years, it has been a blast. Unfortunately, it seems like it’s the end of AutoPatcher as we know it.

Comments are welcome…

Antonis Kaladis

and here goes the notice from Microsoft………

Demand for Immediate Take-Down: Notice of Infringing Activity
—————————————————————————-

URL: http://www.autopatcher.com/downloads/
CASE #: —–

29 August 2007

Dear Sir or Madam,

Microsoft has received information that the domain listed above, which appears to be on servers under your control, is offering unlicensed copies of, or is engaged in other unauthorized activities relating to copyrighted works published by Microsoft.

1. Identification of copyrighted works:

Copyrighted work(s):
Windows XP Media Center Edition
Windows XP Professional
Windows XP Home Edition
Windows XP Professional x64
Windows 2003 Server Enterprise
Windows Vista Ultimate
Windows 2000 Professional
Office Professional Edition 2003
Office Professional 2007
Office XP Professional

Copyright owner:
Microsoft Corporation

2. Copyright infringing material or activity found at the following location(s): http://www.autopatcher.com/downloads/

The above computer program(s) is being made available for copying, through downloading, at the above location without authorization of the copyright owner.

3. Statement of authority:

The information in this notice is accurate, and I hereby certify under penalty of perjury that I am authorized to act on behalf of Microsoft, the owner of the copyright(s) in the work(s) identified above. I have a good faith belief that none of the materials or activities listed above have been authorized by Microsoft, its agents, or the law.

We hereby give notice of these activities to you and request that you take expeditious action to remove or disable access to the material described above, and thereby prevent the illegal reproduction and distribution of this software via your company’s network.

We appreciate your cooperation in this matter. Please advise us regarding what actions you take.

Yours sincerely,

—– ——
Internet Investigator

on behalf of Microsoft Corporation
One Microsoft Way
Redmond, WA 98052
United States of America

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xp-AntiSpy 3.96.6

Posted: August 29, 2007 in Softwares

The xp-AntiSpy is a little utility that lets you disable some built-in update and authentication ‘features’ in WindowsXP. For example, there’s a service running in the background which is called ‘Automatic Updates’. If you like, you can even disable these functions manually, by going through the System and checking or unchecking some checkboxes. This will take you approximately half an hour. But why wast time when a little neat utility can do the same in 1 minute? This utility was successfully tested by lots of users, and was found to disable all the known ‘Suspicious’ Functions in WindowsXP. It’s customizable, but comes up with the Default settings, which are recommended. This utility is DONATIONWARE! This means, you don’t have to pay anything for this program and you can give it to anyone who’s interested in it, as long as you don’t sell it.

What’s new:

* A setting was added to prevent the Media Library of the Windows Media Player 11 from beeing shared on the network
* A few things have been fixed to ensure the Vista compatibility.

Download: xp-AntiSpy 3.96.6 (installer)
Download: xp-AntiSpy 3.96.6 (no installer)
Link: Home Page

Executor 0.95b

Posted: August 29, 2007 in Softwares

This is launcher and a more powerful and customizable version of windows run. The program originated as I was sick of spending too much time searching for programs through my ever growing windows start-menu and also found myself using windows run more and more frequently. There was of course already programs like this available, but each had it’s annoyance or missing features or too( !! ) geeky. So I decide to code my own app to rid me of using the windows start-menu and windows run.

Many features like: customizable keywords, history, auto-completion (keywords, history, file system), drop-down or vista like list, hotkeys, besides keywords Executor can automatically match start-menu items, control panel items and other handy items, start-menu importer, a “Find [text]” keyword that uses Windows Instant Search (Vista) or Windows Desktop Search (XP etc). skinable, very customizable, url and email detection, one keyword can launch multiple keywords/files/urls/programs etc, optional icon and program title display, customizable hotkey, a number of special commands and parameters, filesystem autocompletion, optional sounds, intergrated calculator and more.

This is BETA software!, please use caution when installing it on your system
Download: Executor 0.95b
Screenshot: >> Click Here <<
View: Presentation | What’s new in this version ?
Link: Home Page

Ad-Aware 2007 7.0.2.1

Posted: August 29, 2007 in Softwares

Ad-Aware 2007 Free remains the most popular anti-spyware product for computer users around the world, with nearly one million downloads every week. Ad-Aware 2007 Free version provides you with advanced protection against spyware that secretly attaches and takes control of your computer, resulting in aggressive advertising pop-ups, sluggish computer activity, even identity theft through stolen bank details, passwords, and credit card account numbers. If you want real-time scanning capabilities, consider upgrading to Ad-Aware 2007 Plus for real-time protection against spyware, all the time!

What’s New in Ad-Aware 2007 Free?

* Redesigned Engine – Benefit from superior program flexibility and more accurate scanning methods with all-new program architecture.
* Improved Code Sequence Identification (CSI) Technology – Boost your privacy protection with precise detection of embedded malware, including known and emerging threats.
* Incremental Definition File Updates – Save precious time and resources with smaller update files resulting in faster download times.
* TrackSweep – Control privacy by erasing tracks left behind while surfing the Web on Internet Explorer, Firefox, and Opera, with one easy click.
* Multiple Browser Support – Choose Internet Explorer, Firefox, or Opera with expanded browser support.
* New Straightforward User Interface – Effortlessly maneuver the complexities of malware detection and removal with our new user-friendly interface.

More Key Features

* User-Controlled Spyware Removal – Decide for yourself what to delete from your system and what to keep.
*ExtensiveDetection Database – Stay protected with regular updates fromtheextensive library of identified and analyzed spyware.
* System Restore Point – Easily revert back to your clean system to recover from a spyware attack.

Latest Changes:

* Supports Windows Vista 32-bit

Download: Ad-Aware 2007 Free 7.0.2.1
Screenshot: >> Click here <<
Link: Lavasoft Home Page

Firefox Campus Edition 2.0.0.6

Posted: August 26, 2007 in Softwares

Firefox Campus Edition combines the Firefox web browser with special extras that give you streamlined access to music, cool sites and useful research tools. It’s a way to get the most out of the web that’s been created just for students. And it’s free!

What extras are included?

– FoxyTunes lets you control almost any media player and find lyrics, covers, videos, bios and much more with a click right from your browser.
– StumbleUpon lets you channel surf the Internet to find great websites, videos, photos and more based on your interests.
–  Zotero helps you collect, manage, and cite your research sources. It lives right where you do your work – in the web browser itself.

Download: Firefox Campus Edition 2.0.0.6
Link: Home Page

NSIS (Nullsoft Scriptable Install System) is a professional open source system to create Windows installers. It is designed to be as small and flexible as possible and is therefore very suitable for internet distribution. Being a user’s first experience with your product, a stable and reliable installer is an important component of succesful software. With NSIS you can create such installers that are capable of doing everything that is needed to setup your software. NSIS is script-based and allows you to create the logic to handle even the most complex installation tasks. Many plug-ins and scripts are already available: you can create web installers, communicate with Windows and other software components, install or update shared components and more.


Changes:

Major Changes

* Fixed a bug introduced in version 2.29 that caused invalid $SMPROGRAMS value on Windows 98 (bug #176626
* Modern UI 2 beta: Simpler code, easier to extend and makes use of nsDialogs

Minor Changes

* Added InstallOptions.nsh with relevant usage macros, based on the old Modern UI macros
* Added LangFile.nsh allowing creation of langauge files that can be included with a single command with defaults for missing strings (when LANGFILE_DEFAULT is set)
* Added LB_ERR and CB_ERR to WinMessages.nsh (bug #1771644)
* Fixed CreateDirectory logging (patch #1768584)
* Fixed escaping of quotes with $ in macros (bug #171370
* Minor documentation improvements
* Modern UI 1.80: New language files structure based on LangFile.nsh
* Modern UI 1.80: MUI_LANGDLL_DISPLAY now reads previous settings on silent installations as well
* Modern UI 1.80: Added MUI_CUSTOMFUNCTION_MOUSEOVERSECTION (patch #1762003)

Utilities and Plug-ins

* Various nsDialogs improvements including RTL support, more macros in nsDialogs.nsh and initial documentation

Translations

* Catalan returns
* Danish corrections
* Slovak corrections (patch #1762627)

Build System

* More HPUX fixes (bug #1755148, bug #1753063, bug #1758873, patch #1758863)
* Ignore known failing tests by default on POSIX

Download: NSIS 2.30 freeware
Screenshot: >> Click here <<
Link: NSIS Home Page

A Leader’s Mood
The Dimmer Switch of Performance
By Bruna Martinuzzi

In response to a discussion on the effect of a leader’s mood on the performance of a team, a participant in a recent leadership workshop made this heartfelt and realistic remark: “I cannot see how I am expected to be in a good mood for four quarters in a row.”

The point is well taken. But can you afford, as a leader, to even entertain this thought? All of the research on employee performance points to the contrary. There is a concept in French which is called “Noblesse oblige”. It means, roughly, that wealth, power and prestige go hand-in-hand with certain social responsibilities – in other words, with privilege comes duty. It is a privilege when we have the opportunity to lead a team of people, but with it comes many responsibilities, chief of which, some leadership pundits would contend, is managing moods.

In a Harvard Business Review article called Leadership That Gets Results, Daniel Goleman cites research which shows that up to 30% of a company’s financial results (as measured by key business performance indicators such as revenue growth, return on sales, efficiency and profitability) are determined by the climate of the organization.

So what is the major factor that drives the climate of an organization? It’s the leader: in Primal Leadership: Realizing the Power of Emotional Intelligence, Goleman states that roughly 50-70% of how employees perceive their organization’s climate is attributable to the actions and behaviors of their leader. A leader creates the environment that determines people’s moods at the office and their mood, in turn, affects their productivity and level of engagement.

Afterglow or Aftermath?

Witness the number of times you may have driven home with an internal glow, reliving a positive encounter with an upbeat and supportive boss, perhaps savoring a “bon mot” about your performance that he or she left with you on a Friday afternoon. How great it made you feel, and how eager you were to get out of bed on the following Monday morning, and get back to the office to give that man or woman the very best that you had to offer. That’s the “afterglow” that lingers and gives you renewed energy to be more productive, to bring your finest talents to work.

And think about the reverse of the afterglow – the aftermath, or bitter aftertaste. This is what Susan Scott, in Fierce Conversations: Achieving Success at Work and in Life, One Conversation at a Time, brilliantly calls “The Emotional Wake.” That’s what lingers with you after being the recipient of some acrid remarks from a leader in a negative mood. How did that affect your determination to overcome difficulties in a project, to keep your heart fully engaged in the process, to want to continue to give that person your very best game?

Contagion and Consequences

Leadership literature is full of studies attesting to the consequences of a leader’s mood. One such study involved 62 CEOs and their top management teams and it showed that the more upbeat, energetic and enthusiastic the executive team was, the more co-operatively they worked together, and the better the company’s business results. The study also showed that the longer a company was managed by an executive team that didn’t get along well, the poorer the company’s market returns.

Perhaps nowhere is a leader’s mood more crucial than in the service industry where employees in a bad mood can, without fail, adversely affect business. In one of a multitude of such studies involving 53 sales managers in retail outlets who led groups ranging in size from four to nine members, it was found that when managers themselves were in an upbeat, positive mood, their moods spilled over to their staff, positively affecting the staff’s performance and increasing sales. We can all take an inspiration from organizations such as Starbucks who place great value on the importance of creating a positive climate for employees which, in turn, ensures a pleasant customer experience and repeat visits. “We are always focused on our people” is an explicit statement to new recruits on the company’s career site.

When we move the curtain a bit, we can see clearly that a leader’s bad mood is a source of infection – an emotional contagion that eventually spreads across people to entire units. We can learn a thing or two from leadership in the military. Imagine the effect on troop morale and energy that an “overwhelmed”, “anxious”, “worried” or “irate” leader would have? And how about a leader who is plagued by uncertainty? “Indecision,” as HA Hopf puts it, “is contagious. It transmits itself to others.” It can become debilitating and habit-forming in an organization, as people take their cues from the leader’s state of mind.

Inconsistent Means Unpredictable

We could argue that the occasional bad mood, the occasional rant, on a bad “corporate hair day”, is excusable. Often, we refer to this type of behavior with statements such as: “She can’t control her temper sometimes, but she is so brilliant”. Or, “He has an amazing mind but he has a tendency to shout at people when it’s stressful.” It is as though brilliance is an excuse for bad behavior. And it may very well have to be in some environments – but the message it sends to constituents is one of inconsistency, which is an undesirable trait in any leader. We want our leaders to be predictable because there is comfort and safety in predictability. Predictability engenders trust and an unpredictable leader elicits anxiety and, in some cases, even fear, both of which negatively affect performance and productivity.

Of course, no leader steps out of the elevator in the morning with an intention to spread a bad mood around but, as sure as there is gravity, events occur during the course of some days that can derail even the best among us. To be clear, we are not advocating that leaders turn into a shrink wrapped version, complete with false smiles and fake cheerfulness. Constituents spot a non-genuine smile anyway and are very adept at noticing when a leader infantilizes them.

The Right Mood?

There are, of course, no easy solutions to managing emotions on an hourly basis in the often difficult circumstances in which leaders must operate and make decisions. However, we can draw some advice from another Harvard Business Review article entitled Primal Leadership: The Hidden Driver of Great Performance. First of all, it’s important to note that a leader’s mood has the greatest impact on performance when it is upbeat. But it must also be in tune with those around him.

Goleman et al call this dynamic resonance. “Good moods galvanize good performance, but it doesn’t make sense for a leader to be as chipper as a blue jay at dawn if sales are tanking or the business is going under. The most effective executives display moods and behaviors that match the situation at hand, with a healthy dose of optimism mixed in. They respect how other people are feeling – even if it is glum or defeated – but they also model what it looks like to move forward with hope and humor.” The operative threesome here is “optimism”, “hope” and “humor”. As someone once put it, leaders are dealers in hope.

Steps Towards Better Performance

So what are the specific recommendations? Your mood and behavior affects performance. How do you work on attaining the consistent, emotionally intelligent leadership behaviors that breed success in yourself and others? Here are a few other suggestions to consider that can improve your and your team’s performance:

  1. Model Meeting Behavior
    Take a hard look at your behavior in meetings, which are often “cauldrons of emotion.” Do you model the way by setting a positive tone right from the start? Or do you impose your own “pace” based on how you feel at the moment? Aim for a calm, relaxed mood, and a consistent, positive approach.
  2. Look For Good In Others
    Long before leadership books were in vogue, Andre Malraux, French novelist and statesman, reminded us that one of the central objectives of a leader is to make others aware of the greatness that lies in them. Be known in your organization as someone who is always on the lookout for what is right with people. It engenders good will and is good for business.
  3. Read The Climate
    Do you have a good reading of the climate of your unit or organization? Can you accurately sense what the emotional atmosphere is? Is it upbeat? Is it energized? Is it down or dejected? Do people seem slightly apprehensive and somewhat cautious in your presence? Can you ask a trusted acolyte if the atmosphere changes when you are away?
  4. Be Pleasant and Cooperative
    If you are an emergent leader, and working on having a pleasant personality is not a priority for you, consider putting some effort into cultivating this prized quality. It is almost impossible to have executive presence without it. Be cooperative, for example sharing ideas and shortcuts. This is another example of how mood affects productivity.
  5. Be Emotionally Attractive
    Along that vein, focus on being emotionally attractive. This links to the concept of resonant leadership. Resonant leaders are individuals who have the ability to manage their own emotions and those of others in a manner that drives the success of their teams and organizations. In Resonant Leadership: Renewing Yourself and Connecting with Others through Mindfulness, Hope and Compassion, Richard Boyatzis and Annie McKee explain that resonant leaders create a positive emotional tone in the organization and engage and inspire people. As the title of their book indicates, these leaders possess three core qualities which are: mindfulness, hope, and compassion. Consider making these a part of your arsenal as a leader.
  6. Manage the Emotions of Change
    Be particularly mindful of how you manage emotions if your organization is undergoing change: how you handle emotions during these crucial times can help or hinder the change process. It’s a known fact that if the resistance to change is emotional, it is the hardest form of resistance to overcome. As the leader handling a change initiative, don’t avoid the emotions that accompany the change process. Set the mood and manage the emotions – or they will manage you.

If you cringe at the whole notion of emotions in the workplace, talk of empathy and compassion, intuition or discussions of emotional intelligence, I encourage you to reconsider this mindset. Hone your intuitive ability, and listen to those hunches that hint to you that something in your behavior and actions on bad days is causing a ripple effect on others. These are the whispers we try to dismiss when we elect to focus only on “rationality”. Intuition is a precious tool worth including in our kit. Einstein put it best: “The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift.”

As the leader, you have in your hand the switch that can control the intensity of engagement of the people who do the work in your organization. It’s like being a director in a movie: “The first work of the director is to set a mood so that the actor’s work can take place” (William Friedkin, American movie and television director/producer.) A leader’s upbeat mood metaphorically oxygenates the blood of followers – it’s a transfusion into the corporate arteries. It may be one of the most potent contributions you can make as a leader.

Dealing with Poor Performance
Lack of Ability, or Low Motivation?

For every hundred men hacking away at the branches of a diseased tree,
only one will stoop to inspect the roots.
– Chinese proverb

Are individual members of your team performing less well than you’d hoped? If so, this proverb can take on great significance. To figure out what’s causing the performance issue, you have to get to the root of the problem.

But because employee performance affects organizational performance, we tend to want to look for a quick fix. Would a training course help Ted? Or should you move him into a different role?

These types of solutions focus largely on the ability of the person performing the job. Performance, though, is a function of both ability and motivation.

Performance = Ability x Motivation

Where:

  • Ability is the person’s aptitude, as well as the training and resources supplied by the organization

  • Motivation is the product of desire and commitment

Someone with 100% motivation and 75% ability can often achieve above-average performance. But a worker with only 25% ability won’t be able to achieve the type of performance you expect, regardless of his or her level of motivation.

This is why recruitment and job matching are such critical parts of performance management. Be sure to assess ability properly during the selection process. Minor deficiencies can certainly be improved through training – however, most organizations don’t have the time or resources needed to remedy significant gaps.

Diagnosing Poor Performance

So, before you can fix poor performance, you have to understand its cause. Does it come from lack of ability or low motivation?

Incorrect diagnoses can lead to lots of problems later on. If you believe an employee is not making enough of an effort, you’ll likely put increased pressure on him or her to perform. But if the real issue is ability, then increased pressure may only make the problem worse.

Low ability may be associated with the following:

  • Over-difficult tasks.
  • Low individual aptitude, skill, and knowledge.
  • Evidence of strong effort, despite poor performance.
  • Lack of improvement over time.

People with low ability may have been poorly matched with jobs in the first place. They may have been promoted to a position that’s too demanding for them. Or maybe they no longer have the support that previously helped them to perform well.

Enhancing Ability

There are five main ways to overcome performance problems associated with a lack of ability. Consider using them in this sequence, which starts with the least intrusive:

  • Resupply.
  • Retrain.
  • Refit.
  • Reassign.
  • Release.

Be sure to address each of these interventions in one-on-one performance interviews with employees.

1. Resupply – Focus on the resources provided to do the job. Do employees have what they need to perform well and meet expectations?

  • Ask them about additional resources they think they need.
  • Listen for points of frustration.
  • Note where employees report that support is inadequate.
  • Verify the claims with your own investigation. People will often blame external sources for their poor performance before admitting their own fault.

This is a highly effective first step in addressing performance. It signals to members of your team that you’re interested in their perspective, and are willing to make the required changes.

2. Retrain – Provide additional training to team members. Explore with them whether they have the actual skills required to do what’s expected. Given the pace of change of technology, it’s easy for people’s skills to become obsolete.

This option recognizes the need to retain employees and keep their skills current. There are various types of retraining you can provide:

  • Training seminars with in-house or external providers.
  • Computer-based training (CBT).
  • Simulation exercises.
  • Subsidized college or university courses.

Resupplying and retraining will often cure poor performance. People and organizations may get into ruts, and fail to recognize these issues until poor performance finally highlights them.

3. Refit – When these first two measures aren’t sufficient, consider refitting the job to the person. Are there parts of the job that can be reassigned? Analyze the individual components of the work, and try out different combinations of tasks and abilities. This may involve rearranging the jobs of other people as well. Your goal is to retain the employee, meet operational needs, and provide meaningful and rewarding work to everyone involved. (For more detail, see our article on Job Enrichment.)

4. Reassign – When revising or refitting the job doesn’t turn the situation around, look at reassigning the poor performer. Typical job reassignments may decrease the demands of the role by reducing the need for the following:

  • Responsibility
  • Technical knowledge
  • Interpersonal skills

If you use this option, make sure the reassigned job is still challenging and stimulating. To ensure that this strategy is successful, never use demotion as a punishment tactic within your organization. Remember, the employee’s performance is not intentionally poor – he or she simply lacked the skills for the position.

5. Release – As a final option for lack of ability, you may need to let the employee go. Sometimes there are no opportunities for reassignment, and refitting isn’t appropriate for the organization. In these cases, the best solution for everyone involved is for the employee to find other work. You may need to consider contractual terms and restrictions; however, in the long run, this may be the best decision for your whole team.

Remember, there are potential negative consequences of retaining a poor performer after you’ve exhausted all the options available:

  • You’ll annoy other members of your team, who may have to work harder to “carry” the poor performer.
  • You may promote a belief in others that you’re prepared to accept mediocrity – or, worse, underperformance.
  • You may waste precious time and resources that could be better used elsewhere.
  • You may signal that some employees deserve preferential treatment.
  • You may undermine the whole idea of finding the best person for the job.

Improving Motivation

Sometimes poor performance has its roots in low motivation. When this is the case, you need to work closely with the employee to create a motivating environment in which to work. There are three key interventions that may improve people’s motivation:

  • Setting of performance goals.
  • Provision of performance assistance.
  • Provision of performance feedback.

1. Performance Goals – Goal setting is a well-recognized aspect of performance improvement. Employees must understand what’s expected of them and agree on what they need to do to improve. For a detailed explanation of the goal setting process, see our articles on Goal Setting, Golden Rules of Goal Setting and Locke’s Goal Setting Theory.

2. Performance Assistance – Once you’ve set appropriate goals, help your team member succeed by doing the following:

  • Regularly assessing the employee’s ability, and take action if it’s deficient.
  • Providing the necessary training.
  • Securing the resources needed.
  • Encouraging cooperation and assistance from coworkers.

Tip
Consider using the GROW Model as a way of coaching employees to improve their performance.

3. Performance Feedback – People need feedback on their efforts. They have to know where they stand in terms of current performance and long-term expectations. When providing feedback, keep in mind the importance of the following:

  • Timeliness – Provide feedback as soon as possible. This links the behavior with the evaluation.
  • Openness and Honesty – Make sure the feedback is accurate. Avoid mixed messages or talking about the person rather than the performance. That said, provide both positive and negative feedback so that employees can begin to truly understand their strengths and weaknesses.
  • Personalized Rewards – A large part of feedback involves rewards and recognition. Make sure that your company has a system that acknowledges the successes of employees.

Supporting this, ensure that you meet regularly with the employee, so that you can review progress and provide regular feedback.

Creating a Performance Improvement Plan

So how do you do this in practice? This is where you need to develop a Performance Improvement Plan. Armed with the strategies we’ve looked at, you first need to evaluate the performance issue that you’re facing:

  • Have you discussed with the person what he or she feels the problem is?
  • Have you evaluated your organization’s motivation system? Are you doing everything you can to recognize and reward people’s contributions?
  • Are you rewarding the things that you actually want done?
  • Do you have regular goal setting and development meetings with members of your team?
  • Do you help your people keep their skills current?

From there, it’s important that you and the employee discuss and agree upon a plan for improving performance. Write down what you’ve agreed, along with dates by which goals should be achieved. Then monitor progress with the team member, and use the techniques we’ve discussed above for increasing motivation and dealing with ability-related issues.

Recognize that the actions needed to close ability gaps need high motivation on the employee’s part to be successful. The two causes of poor performance – lack of ability and low motivation – are inextricably intertwined, and goal setting, feedback, and a supportive work environment are necessary conditions for improving both.

Key points:

You need to understand the root of a performance problem before you can fully address it. Ability and motivation go together to impact performance, and the most successful performance improvement efforts combine strategies for improving each. This creates a positive environment where people feel supported to reach their performance potential; and feel valued, knowing that the organization wants to find a good fit for their abilities.

At times, your interventions may not be enough to salvage the situation. As long as you’ve given performance enhancement your best effort, and you’ve reasonably exhausted all your options, then you can feel confident that you’re making the right decision if you do need to let someone go.

Before going down that route, however, try the strategies discussed here and create a great work environment for your employees – one where their abilities are used to their full potential, and where good motivational techniques are used on a regular basis.

Auto Runs 8.70

Posted: August 26, 2007 in Softwares

AutoRuns 8.70

This utility, which has the most comprehensive knowledge of auto-starting locations of any startup monitor, shows you what programs are configured to run during system bootup or login, and shows you the entries in the order Windows processes them. These programs include ones in your startup folder, Run, RunOnce, and other Registry keys. You can configure Autoruns to show other locations, including Explorer shell extensions, toolbars, browser helper objects, Winlogon notifications, auto-start services, and much more. Autoruns goes way beyond the MSConfig utility bundled with Windows Me and XP.

Autoruns’ Hide Signed Microsoft Entries option helps you to zoom in on third-party auto-starting images that have been added to your system and it has support for looking at the auto-starting images configured for other accounts configured on a system. Also included in the download package is a command-line equivalent that can output in CSV format, Autorunsc.

You’ll probably be surprised at how many executables are launched automatically!

Autoruns works on all versions of Windows including 64-bit versions.
Download: AutoRuns 8.70

View: Microsoft Sysinternals

Windows Xp – Anti Spy 3.96-5

Posted: August 26, 2007 in Softwares

XP-AntiSpy 3.96-5

XP-AntiSpy is an utility that let’s you disable some built-in update and authentication features in Windows XP.

 Download: XP-AntiSpy 3.96-5 (Freeware)

 View: Website